Build

Build the project

Step: Build with Visual Studio

Open the OGS.sln either by double-clicking it in the file browser or opening in Visual Studio via File / Open / Project.

On the project explorer right-click on ogs or ogs-gui and choose Set as startup project. Then press F5 or click the green arrow to build and start the project.

About Visual Studio startup projects

The reason for this is that you can have only one sub-project of your Visual Studio Solution activated for debugging (e.g. by pressing F5). Per default this is the first sub-project (in the case of a CMake-generated project this is ALL_BUILD). This must be manually set to a sub-project which generates an executable (a library sub-project cannot be started). And because this setting is stored in user specific project file it cannot be set via CMake.

How to work with CMake and Visual Studio

You can work normally in Visual Studio but remember that you have to make project changes in the CMakeLists.txt-file and not inside Visual Studio. So you can add a new source file within Visual Studios File menu but you have to add that file also to the CMake file. Every time you change a CMakeLists.txt and you build the project a new CMake run is automatically invoked. After that Visual Studio informs you that the project files were changed and it reloads them.

Option: Make

To build with the make tool on the shell go to your previously created build directory and type make:

To speedup the compilation process append the number of cores of your cpu to the make command. E.g. for 8 cores:

Option: Eclipse

To let CMake generate the Eclipse project files change the generator argument to the CMake run:

Or with ccmake

Start the Eclipse ide. From the menu choose File / Import. In the import dialog choose General / Existing projects into workspace and click Next. In Select root directory select your build directory and make sure that Copy project into workspace is unchecked. Click Finish.

Option: Make

To build with the make tool on the shell go to your previously created build directory and type make:

To speedup the compilation process append the number of cores of your cpu to the make command. E.g. for 8 cores:

Option: Xcode

To let CMake generate the Xcode project files change the generator argument on the CMake run:

Or with ccmake

Then load the generated project file by either clicking the OGS.xcodeproj or via

In Xcode choose ogs or ogs-gui from the drop-down menu on the top right and then hit the Run-button.

Waiting

So now the build process is running… This can take some time because maybe there are external libraries which get automatically downloaded and compiled. This step is only done once per build directory, so subsequent builds will be much faster. See this for more.

Finished!

Congratulations you have finished the Getting Started-section!

Have a look at the other sections of this guide. Maybe check out Development Workflows if you are interested in actively contributing to the project. The Configuration Options-page shows you all available build customizations. Go ahead!


This article was written by Lars Bilke. If you are missing something or you find an error please let us know. Generated with Hugo 0.47.1. Last revision: August 20, 2018
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